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Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Homemade, Gluten Free Flour Combinations For Baking

 I decided it is only fair if I help you save money along with trying new recipes, and one way to save money is to make your own flour combinations for baking.  I will admit, I buy my share of the pre-made baking mixes and I love them. But there are many other options to try. The best advise I can give you on gluten free baking, is to try different combinations. Without a doubt you will find you have a preference to certain flavors and textures. For example, my favorite flours for cookies are garbanzo bean, brown rice, and oat in various combinations. I've noticed that when I use the bean flour and rice flour together I get a chewy cookie....I like chewy cookies!   Experimenting is the key in gluten free baking. I hope this will help get you started.

Basic Gluten Free Flour Mix  -can be used to replace wheat flour in any recipe.
2 cups white rice flour
2/3 cup potato starch
1/3 cup tapioca flour

Basic Rice Flour Mix - can be used to replace wheat flour in any recipe.
3 cups rice flour (brown or white)
3 cups tapioca flour
3 cups cornstarch
3 Tbsp potato flour (not potato starch)


All-Purpose Flour Blend  -can be used to replace wheat flour in any recipe.
2 cups rice flour
1 cup tapioca starch/flour
1 cup cornstarch or potato starch



High-Protein Flour Blend - works best in baked goods that require elasticity, such as wraps & pie crusts.
2 1/2 cups bean flour (garbanzo bean or soy)
2 cups arrowroot starch, cornstarch or potato starch
2 cups tapioca starch/flour
2 cups white or brown rice flour



Note:  For the flour mixes shown above, add xanthan gum or guar gum to the recipe. It provides the binding needed to give the baked product proper elasticity, which prevents crumbling.
Use these amounts:
1/2 tsp. per cup of flour blend for cakes, cookies, bars, muffins & quick breads.
1 tsp. per cup of flour blend for yeast bread, pizza dough or other baked items that call for yeast.


 Note:  The flour mixes shown below have xanthan gum already added in the mix.

All-Purpose Flour Mix for any baking recipe.
1 cup white rice flour
1 cup oat flour
1 cup coconut flour
1 cup tapioca flour or starch
1/4 cup cornstarch
3 1/2 tsp xanthan gum


Self-Rising Flour Blend -Use this specifically for muffins, scones, cakes, cupcakes or any recipe that uses baking powder for leavening.
2 1/2 cups white sorghum flour
2 1/2 cups white rice flour
1 cup tapioca starch/flour
4 tsp. xanthan gum or guar gum
8 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt

Gluten Free Combo Flour Mixture - great for pound cakes, fruitcakes, and sweet breads.
2 1/2 cups brown or white rice flour
1 cup potato starch
1 cup tapioca flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup bean flour (chick-pea or garbanzo bean flour is lighter, fava bean flour is denser)
2 Tbsp xanthan gum


I have also found organizing and storing of  the flours and grains is a huge time saver. It also helps you keep track of what you have on hand.

 I use the largest containers for the flours I use most often.  This allows me to purchase larger amounts and I am more likely to have them on hand when I need them. Less common  flours and grains, can go in jars or smaller containers. If you have the space, flours should be stored for longer periods of time in the freezer. If I happen to get a flour on sale and buy extra, I place it in freezer bags, and store it in the freezer until my cupboards need refilled again.
I have every container and jar labeled. Behind this first row of containers is a second row of containers as well.

I always have my eyes open for gluten free grains and cereals on sale, this will also save you money in the long run. Especially if you are like me and don't live in a town that has a good selection of gluten free products...if any. And it is not fun to run out and have nothing to eat!
Try to have a neat organized area to store the products so you can keep a rotation going.














28 comments:

  1. Thanks for this list! I have a son with several allergies and am getting a Vitamix to make our own flour blends. Can sorhgum flour be replaced by something like garbanzo flour if we don't like the flavor? Also, to make bean flour, do you just use dry beans in a grinder or do they have to be prepped somehow? Thanks! :)

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  2. Hi - I actually have never used my Vitamix to grind beans, but since I have a Vitamix I looked up the instructions. Only grind 2 cups of grains or beans at a time and never grind them for more than 2 minutes or your machine can become damaged. Start the Vitamix on variable 1 then turn the machine on and quickly increase speed to variable 10, then to the high setting (switch). It says it can take up to a minute. I think I will try this too! I couldn't find anywhere on the internet or in my books about any special preparations of the bean.
    As far as subbing other flours for sorghum, absolutely! A mix of flours is always the best way to go. I really like garbanzo and rice flour together for cookies and baked goods. Oat is a nice addition too. I wouldn't suggest using straight bean though due to a stronger flavor. Good luck - my kids were on special diets as well. My son seems to have outgrown them, but my daughter, like me hasn't. Take care.

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  3. Thanks! :) I normally use oat flour for cookies and such. I'm excited to try out new blends to make the flavor and texture better, though. I was going to make a blend of garbanzo and rice for bread and crackers, but I'll definitely try it out for sweet treats, too! :D

    I'm hoping my son outgrows some of the allergies. Celiac runs in our family, so I'm guessing he won't outgrow that, but maybe some of the other ones. :) Thanks again and take care, as well! :)

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  4. Great post, thankyou, I,m on a mission to conquer a great gluten free bread, will let you know results

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    1. Good luck to you - bread is a goal for so many of us, including myself. I would love to hear your results!

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  5. your the best! thank you!!

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    1. You are so welcome...hope it is useful for you!

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  6. Thankyou very much for listing this. It's very helpful

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  7. Hi Stephanie - I am so glad to help! Happy baking!!

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  8. Can you tell me what liquids are used for these blends & what quantity?

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  9. Scratch that, found what I was looking for on another page :-)

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  10. Hi Swise - glad you found the info you were looking for. I just wanted to say that I don't change the liquid amounts in the recipes, I just substitute the all-purpose flour with a gluten free combination.

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  11. Hi. Thanks for the info. I notice that both Basic Gluten Free Flour Mix and All-Purpose Flour Blend call for 2 c. rice flour. But the proportions of the other ingredients are different. Pls. explain. Thanks so much.

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    1. Hi, any flour blend combinations can have similar ingredients with many different variations mixed in. Rice flour is a very popular gluten free flour and used in many flour blends. (As you may have noticed) It has a mild flavor and produces a great baked product. These particular flour blends given on this post can be used to substitute regular flour in a recipe, cup for cup, due to the particular increments. But…if you were making cookies for example and wanted to add coconut or sorghum flour in place of some of the rice flour, the cookies would still turn out fine, I do it all the time. Especially if I am out of a particular flour. Because you are asking this excellent question, I sense you might like to look into this further and I have a great link for you, http://www.glutenfreegigi.com/5-flour-related-mistakes-that-lead-to-dry-gluten-free-baked-goods-plus-tips-for-baking-success/ I hope this answers your questions. If not let me know! Happy New Year - Mary

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    2. Thanks so much, M E, for your fast and complete answer. Yes, the link was very useful. BTW, I often add yogurt to GF or non-GF recipes to add moisture. As you may have guessed, I'm rather new at GF baking. Could you tell me how a quick bread would result if it were made with the Basic Gluten Free Flour Mix vs. the All-Purpose Flour Blend? Again, thank you.

      1 cup tapioca starch/flour
      1 cup cornstarch or potato starch

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    3. You are very welcome. Yogurt would definitely help with moisture and probably could replace some fat in muffins and quick breads. Great idea! Actually I would never guess you are a new comer to gluten free baking! There are always new things to learn and discover, it's an ongoing learning process from day one. I am certainly proof to that.
      You asked about making a quick bread and which flour blend I would use. Actually, these two are so very similar I feel your end product would be very much the same. I must admit I use potato starch more often than corn starch. And that is only because I seem to always have such a large quantity of it in my cupboard. I probably use the Basic Gluten Free Flour Blend in muffins and quick breads more because it makes a smaller quantity. I don't tend to make a lot of extra flour blends and store them. I am guilty of watching for sales, and buying Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free All Purpose Flour or Namaste Foods Gluten Free Perfect Flour Blend. Yikes…now I am showing my lazy side. Experiment and let me know what you like.
      Thanks for the questions! Mary

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    4. I feel like I should add that I often use a combination of 1 cup brown rice flour and 1 cup gluten free oat flour (I grind up gluten free old fashioned oats in a blender or vitamix) for muffins. Also I have an favorite combination for cookies: 1 part garbanzo bean flour and 1 part brown rice flour. This combination makes a nice chewy cookie. Good luck!
      Mary

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    5. Hello M E, I want to thank you for getting me started on GF baking. I bake only quick breads, not yeast breads, or cookies, or muffins. Since Jan, I've used a GF flour mixture posted on a website you mentioned. It doesn't call for hard-to-find xanthan gum. By substituting that GF mix 1:1 for wheat flour in my regular recipes, I've had excellent results. In addition to adding yogurt, I've learned to bake for less time to prevent dryness.

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  12. Can you sub things like black bean flour etc for the rice flour? trying GF baking and products and the rice flour just doesnt produce a product that tastes passable to me. Closest/best next to bread gf bread I have found was Udi's. Any more advice and clarification appreciated

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  13. Hi Mike, sorry I haven't gotten back to you sooner. This is a busy week for me but I wanted to give you a couple ideas really quick, then I will get back to you as soon as I can after Saturday. I don't have a lot of experience substituting black bean flour, I am more prone to use garbanzo bean flour in baking, mostly in cookies. Many people would agree with you on the rice flour being a tad blah and possibly not as desirable an outcome in baked goods. But…it is also one of the most popular gluten free flours, as you will see it in many mixed flour combinations. You might like sorghum flour, tapioca, or oat flour for baked items. Sorghum and tapioca have a mild flavor and a texture similar to wheat flour and work well for most baked items. It is suggested to mix flours and starches, though I have seen sorghum flour used alone in cookies. Cornstarch, potato starch and arrowroot starch work well with any gluten free flours. Nut flours are becoming more popular, especially almond flour. I am allergic to many nuts so you won't see me using a lot of those. Yes, Udi's has delicious products, but I can't eat those since I am allergic to eggs. My favorite recipe for bread is called the Best Gluten Free Sandwich Rolls, found on my blog. It is versatile and delicious. For a purchased bread to toast I use, a Gluten Free Rice Millet Bread made by Food for Life. It must be toasted though…in my opinion. I use this bread because it is one of the only ones that I can eat with my food sensitivities/allergies. It is found in the freezer section. Remember to always add xathan gum or guar gum to gluten free flours when baking. Some purchased products like Pamela's Gluten Free Flour Mixes, have this already added. Check ingredients. Hope that gets you started…Mary Ellen. Also check out the blog, Gluten Free Goddess for tons of recipes and information. Take care!

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  14. Do you have any suggestions for cake flour or bread flour replacements?

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  15. For cakes and cupcakes I like the Self-Rising Flour Blend that is shown above on this post. It has sorghum flour, rice flour, tapioca starch, xanthan gum or guar gum, baking powder and salt. See above for exact increments.
    For bread I would go with a basic flour mix like, 2 parts brown rice flour, 2/3 part potato starch,and 1/3 part tapioca flour.

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  16. I made up a batch of the Self-Rising Flour Flour Blend for banana muffins. They turned out awesome !!! Texture was great and they rose nicely. It was only after I baked them did I realize that I forgot the tapioca starch... it didn't seem to affect them. Thank you for sharing your recipe.

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  17. Hi, I'm so glad you enjoyed the recipe! As you found out, a variety of gluten free flour combinations work for recipes…I use the rice flour and sorghum together frequently as well. Thanks so much for the comments!! ps…I love banana muffins too.

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  18. I have a recipe very similar to what you posted. I am baking a birthday cake for my son (gluten free and dye free). However, in the excitement of the kids helping me, I forgot to add the tapioca starch. How big of a deal is that? The cake mix is made with rice flour, potato starch, xanthan gum, and the tapioca starch.

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  19. I am so sorry you didn't receive my reply. I was at the airport and tried to answer from my phone, but I don't think it worked. Your cake should have still been ok, the tapioca starch and potato starch are similar from what I've read in creating a tender texture in cakes. Some results from less starch in a mix might be a little chewier end product, for example. How did your cake turn out? Best of luck, Mary Ellen

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  20. Hi Mary, can you clarify which is the better blend for all purposes flour. Seeing as I don't live where I can access different flours regularly, I am after the one that will do everything from bread to cakes and biscuits. I am also after clarification that the above blends are exchangable 1:1 with normal wheat flour recipes? Thanks in advance.

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  21. Hi there Merissa!
    For your basic 1:1 gluten free flour mix, here is a safe choice, people use this one a lot. You will see it in recipe books, magazines, and on many blogs.

    Basic Gluten Free Flour Mix -can be used to replace wheat flour in any recipe.
    2 cups white rice flour
    2/3 cup potato starch
    1/3 cup tapioca flour

    But…as for a bread, and I think you mean a yeast type bread) you are going to see many other variations. You might consider having two flour mixes on hand if you are planning on making a lot of yeast breads.One for everything else and one for your yeast breads.Storing them in the freezer will keep them fresh .But with all that said…I actually use a yeast bread recipe that uses the basic mix I mentioned first. I don't make my bread in a bread pan though, I prefer making sandwich buns. I find the sandwich buns to be super useful. You can cut them and toast them like english muffins, or broil them with butter and garlic for pasta dishes, slice for burgers or sandwiches, or just use as a roll with soups. They are amazing…the best recipe I have ever made. And they freeze well too. I just pop them in a zip lock freezer bag and pull one out when I need it. The recipe is called Best Gluten Free Sandwich Rolls. It's on my blog under side dishes. Unfortunately due to a horrid glitch in one of my programs, many of my pictures have been deleted, that I have posted over the last several years and this recipe is one that was affected. I am replacing them as fast as I can, but it is a slow process.
    If you aren't sensitive to corn, this mix could be used in place of wheat flour as well, for cookies, muffins, cupcakes…

    All-Purpose Flour Blend -can be used to replace wheat flour in any recipe.
    2 cups rice flour
    1 cup tapioca starch/flour
    1 cup cornstarch or potato starch

    Just remember you must add:

    xanthan gum or guar gum to these recipes. It provides the binding needed to give the baked product proper elasticity, which prevents crumbling.
    Use these amounts:
    1/2 tsp. per cup of flour blend for cakes, cookies, bars, muffins & quick breads.
    1 tsp. per cup of flour blend for yeast bread, pizza dough or other baked items that call for yeast.

    Best of luck! Mary

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